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Child Poverty Where You Live

Has child poverty increased or decreased over recent years? Does the cost of housing have an impact? These are the questions raised in the second blog post about child poverty in Weston-super-Mare. It's not a pretty story.

Hello! My name is Holly and I'm one of the Weston Labour bloggers. I'm also a bit of a geek with a love of graphs and data... you have been warned!

So, there may be a lot of graphs about to come your way but I promise you they are easier to digest than tables full of figures that they were created from! If you're only interested in child poverty for a particular area, you can just scroll down to find your ward below. This blog post just puts the numbers out there for us all to think about, please comment below with your thoughts and opinions on what the numbers mean.

Let's start with an overview of the most recent figures available showing the percentage of children living in poverty in each ward in Weston-super-Mare. The blue bars show how many children are living in poverty before housing costs, and the orange bars show how many children are living in poverty after housing costs. Considering most of us have to pay for our housing in one way or another, I'll leave you to decide which is the most realistic figure.

 WSMBHCandAHC.png

 

Has the number of children living in poverty changed over recent years?

Using figures from 2013 and figures from 2015, the graphs below show if child poverty has increased of decreased in each ward. As before, the blue lines show the extent of child poverty before housing costs like rent have been paid, and the orange bars show the extent of child poverty after housing costs. Any comments about poverty from this point on refer only to the after housing costs (AHC) figures... because we pretty much all pay something towards where we live.

SPOILER! Ok, so you don't all want to look at the pretty graphs I've spent an evening making, I get it (but you should if you want more detail and a better-rounded picture...). So to give you the headline, here's a table summarising how poverty has changed in each ward (seriously though, have a look at the graphs too!):

 Screen_Shot_2017-02-23_at_00.16.46.png

*ward boundaries as of 2013

Weston-super-Mare South Ward (Bournville)

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

 southward.png

 

Weston-super-Mare Central 

The number of children living in poverty has remained stable.

WsMCentral.png

 

Weston-super-Mare West (Hillside)

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

WsMWestHillside.png

 

Congresbury

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

Congresbury.png

 

Weston-super-Mare East (Winterstoke)

The number of children living in poverty has remained stable

Winterstoke.png

 

Weston-super-Mare South Worle

The number of children living in poverty has decreased.

SouthWorle.png

 

Banwell and Winscombe

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

BanwellandWinscombe.png

 

Weston-super-Mare Clarence and Uphill

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

ClarenceandUphill.png

 

Weston-super-Mare Milton and Old Worle

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

MiltonandOldWorle.png

 

Weston-super-Mare North Worle

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

NorthWorle.png

 

Hutton and Locking

The number of children living in poverty has remained stable, but high.

HuttonandLocking.png

 

Kewstoke

The number of children living in poverty has increased.

 Kewstoke.png

 

Blagdon and Churchill

The number of children living in poverty has decreased.

BlagdonandChurchill.png

 

I started this blog by saying I was just putting the numbers out there for us all to consider rather than offering my own opinion, and that is how I shall end. Now you have seen the figures, please tell me - what do you think about child poverty where you live?

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